New studies show how to save parasites and why it's important

Mon, 10 Aug 2020 05:31:09 +1000

Andrew Pam <xanni [at] glasswings.com.au>

Andrew Pam
https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-08/uow-nss073020.php

"Parasites have a public relations problem.

Unlike the many charismatic mammals, fishes and birds that receive our
attention (and our conservation dollars), parasites are thought of as
something to eradicate -- and certainly not something to protect.

But only 4% of known parasites can infect humans, and the majority
actually serve critical ecological roles, like regulating wildlife that
might otherwise balloon in population size and become pests. Still, only
about 10% of parasites have been identified and, as a result, they are
mostly left out of conservation activities and research.

An international group of scientists wants to change that. About a dozen
leading parasite ecologists, including University of Washington's
Chelsea Wood, published a paper Aug. 1 in the journal Biological
Conservation, which lays out an ambitious global conservation plan for
parasites."

Via Muse, who wrote:

I remember as a child how some animals were considered expendable.
No more. We are just beginning to understand the value of diversity
and ecological balance.

Save the parasites!

Share and enjoy,
                *** Xanni ***
--
mailto:xanni@xanadu.net               Andrew Pam
http://xanadu.com.au/                 Chief Scientist, Xanadu
http://glasswings.com.au/             Partner, Glass Wings
https://sericyb.com.au/               Manager, Serious Cybernetics

Comment via email

Home E-Mail Sponsors Index Search About Us