Publisher Decries Damn Libraries Entertaining The Masses Stuck At Home For Free

Sun, 2 Aug 2020 06:16:21 +1000

Andrew Pam <xanni [at] glasswings.com.au>

Andrew Pam
<https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20200727/16343744985/publisher-decries-damn-libraries-entertaining-masses-stuck-home-free.shtml>

"For years and years we've pointed out that, if they were invented
today, copyright maximalist authors and publishers would absolutely
scream about libraries and probably sue them out of existence. Some
insisted that we were exaggerating, but now we've seen nearly all of the
big publishers sue the Internet Archive over its digital library that
acts just like a regular library.

But, perhaps the most frustrating part in all of this, is that whenever
these copyright maximalist authors and publishers are confronted about
this, they twist themselves into knots to say "well, I actually love
libraries, but..." before beginning a bunch of arguments that show they
do not, in fact, like libraries. Sometimes, however rarely, a maximalist
just comes out and admits the facts: they fucking hate libraries."

Via Glyn Moody, who wrote "these are sad, sick people…"

Cheers,
        *** Xanni ***
--
mailto:xanni@xanadu.net               Andrew Pam
http://xanadu.com.au/                 Chief Scientist, Xanadu
http://glasswings.com.au/             Partner, Glass Wings
https://sericyb.com.au/               Manager, Serious Cybernetics

Comment via email


Sun, 2 Aug 2020 09:59:52 +1000

Katherine Phelps <muse [at] glasswings.com.au>

Katherine Phelps
I'm always disappointed by these cheap shots.

"Publisher" in this case is Kenneth Whyte, a small publisher of
Sutherland House Books in Canada. He founded his publishing house in
2017 and began releasing books in 2019. All books published are/were
commissioned and edited by Whyte himself.  We aren't talking about a
large publisher making millions even billions of dollars. We are looking
at someone whose budding business has just had a severe blow and may fold.

Michael Masnik is the founder and CEO of a major electronic publishing
house Floor64 with offices in Silicon Valley. He also founded its
publication Techdirt. This is what's said about Techdirt: “Techdirt has
a tremendous influence on the Wall Street Journal,”**Kara Swisher,
Executive Editor/, The Wall Street Journal./
/
/
When I graduated from university it was still possible for most
novelists in the US and the UK to make a modest living. Now days this is
only possible for a few. The same was true for small publishers. We once
had people making a living out of magazines for teddy bear collectors,
people interested in lesser known sports like curling, and more. With
the advent of the internet these have all been wiped out.

It's very easy to get on your high horse when you are a publisher who is
making an upper class salary.

Access to information, thought, and culture is important. It shouldn't
only be in the hands of the wealthy.

However, to make that information, thought, and culture available, the
people creating it must be given the means to live securely.

I would agree with Masnik that we shouldn't be closing down libraries.
Yet, he offers absolutely no alternative as to how writers and
publishers not in the lucrative tech industry are going to survive to
produce the works the library lends.

Here in Australia each time my book Surf's Up: Internet Australian
Style
 is checked out from a library, the government records this and
then regularly sends me payments for its use. This is appropriate use of
taxpayer dollars, since access to these sorts of works also enriches the
country by broadening our minds and forging connections through shared
experiences.

If Masnik really cared about libraries, he should have also shown some
compassion for writers and small publishers. If he really cared he
should have suggested that we tax the rich and use the money to give all
people a safety net, so that they can speak freely and thereby ensure we
truly are living in a democracy. If you dig a little on the Techdirt
site you will notice, _/they do not pay the writers who submit
articles
/_. I think this comes under the heading of the pot calling the
kettle black.

On 2/8/20 6:16 am, Andrew Pam wrote:
<https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20200727/16343744985/publisher-decries-damn-libraries-entertaining-masses-stuck-home-free.shtml>

"For years and years we've pointed out that, if they were invented
today, copyright maximalist authors and publishers would absolutely
scream about libraries and probably sue them out of existence. Some
insisted that we were exaggerating, but now we've seen nearly all of the
big publishers sue the Internet Archive over its digital library that
acts just like a regular library.

But, perhaps the most frustrating part in all of this, is that whenever
these copyright maximalist authors and publishers are confronted about
this, they twist themselves into knots to say "well, I actually love
libraries, but..." before beginning a bunch of arguments that show they
do not, in fact, like libraries. Sometimes, however rarely, a maximalist
just comes out and admits the facts: they fucking hate libraries."

Via Glyn Moody, who wrote "these are sad, sick people…"

Cheers,
      *** Xanni ***

Comment via email

Sun, 2 Aug 2020 11:33:11 +1000

Andrew Pam <xanni [at] glasswings.com.au>

Andrew Pam
On 2/8/20 9:59 am, Katherine Phelps wrote:
Michael Masnik is the founder and CEO of a major electronic publishing
house Floor64 with offices in Silicon Valley. He also founded its
publication Techdirt. This is what's said about Techdirt: “Techdirt has
a tremendous influence on the Wall Street Journal,” **Kara Swisher,
Executive Editor/, The Wall Street Journal./

I believe Techdirt is currently two people including Masnik.

It's very easy to get on your high horse when you are a publisher who is
making an upper class salary.

Techdirt almost folded recently and was only saved by a fundraising
campaign among the readers.  I'd be surprised if Masnik is making "an
upper class salary".

If Masnik really cared about libraries, he should have also shown some
compassion for writers and small publishers. If he really cared he
should have suggested that we tax the rich and use the money to give all
people a safety net, so that they can speak freely and thereby ensure we
truly are living in a democracy.

Techdirt has been pro-Universal Basic Income since at least 2013.

"This feeds into discussions about how creators could live and thrive in
a world where it was legal to share copies of their work. A society that
provided them -- and everyone -- with a basic wage would not need to
rehearse today's sterile arguments about piracy. Artists would have the
option of living on the basic wage while they created, or of making more
money by building on the fact that their work is freely available, as
Techdirt has advocated."

<https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20131016/08185024896/how-to-solve-copyright-problem-give-everyone-universal-basic-income.shtml>

Cheers,
        *** Xanni ***
--
mailto:xanni@xanadu.net               Andrew Pam
http://xanadu.com.au/                 Chief Scientist, Xanadu
http://glasswings.com.au/             Partner, Glass Wings
https://sericyb.com.au/               Manager, Serious Cybernetics

Sun, 2 Aug 2020 13:45:01 +1000

Katherine Phelps <muse [at] glasswings.com.au>

Katherine Phelps
On 2/8/20 11:33 am, Andrew Pam wrote:
On 2/8/20 9:59 am, Katherine Phelps wrote:
Michael Masnik is the founder and CEO of a major electronic publishing
house Floor64 with offices in Silicon Valley. He also founded its
publication Techdirt. This is what's said about Techdirt: “Techdirt has
a tremendous influence on the Wall Street Journal,” **Kara Swisher,
Executive Editor/, The Wall Street Journal./
I believe Techdirt is currently two people including Masnik.

Floor64 was born out of Techdirt, but it now has an expanded team of
analysts to provide corporate blogs with customized business and trend
analysis. Those companies include Volkswagen, Sprint, SAP and Nuance.
Techdirt may not be making them money, but they are making money. You
can take a look at their offices on Google maps. They are not insignificant.

If Masnik really cared about libraries, he should have also shown some
compassion for writers and small publishers. If he really cared he
should have suggested that we tax the rich and use the money to give all
people a safety net, so that they can speak freely and thereby ensure we
truly are living in a democracy.
Techdirt has been pro-Universal Basic Income since at least 2013.

That's very nice, but Masnik ripped into a small Canadian publisher who
was expressing frustration. He should have shown some understanding and
spoken from that point of view. He may not understand because he went to
an expensive university and has been working for people like Intel up
until now.


"This feeds into discussions about how creators could live and thrive in
a world where it was legal to share copies of their work. A society that
provided them -- and everyone -- with a basic wage would not need to
rehearse today's sterile arguments about piracy. Artists would have the
option of living on the basic wage while they created, or of making more
money by building on the fact that their work is freely available, as
Techdirt has advocated."

<https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20131016/08185024896/how-to-solve-copyright-problem-give-everyone-universal-basic-income.shtml>

Cheers,
      Andrew

That is a very good point and should have been drawn from when speaking
about Kenneth Whyte. Though, I would say writers and publishers deserve
more than basic wages for the privilege to do their work.
Home E-Mail Sponsors Index Search About Us